WWW #30: Waiting

Today’s Topic: The perpetual act of waiting that we all go through.

Branching off of my Time Wisp, I wanted to write about how everyone everywhere is in the perpetual state of waiting. You could be waiting for anything – a birthday, job interview, vacation, promotion, graduation, project completion, movie premier, game release, book publishing, etc. – at any given point in time. There are apps for counting down the days, weeks, months, and years until an event that millions of people use so they don’t have to do the math or stress themselves out even further by obsessing over it.

Waiting is just another part of life that we’ve all come to accept and follow without question.

You can see how hard waiting is when you take a look at children, teens, and young adults. They can’t wait to be done with school, find a job they like, find love, make their mark on the world, and so on. Sure, those are all big life events, but waiting can take place on the small scale as well. Waiting for your drink to cool before you can enjoy it; waiting for a friend to be available; waiting for your turn to speak in a group.

When you take a step back and look at it, our lives are 90% waiting and 10% doing (give or take depending on the individual). Imagine your life is like an amusement park. You have to wait in lengthy lines before you get to enjoy the thrill of the rides, much like how you have to wait for the exciting events in your life to happen. Sometimes you may find that the lines are shorter than expected, and sometimes the line may seem endless and infinite. Such is the way of life.

Adding onto the roller coaster analogy, you can’t choose which lines will be long and which will be short, just like you can’t choose how great the eventual ride will be. You might wait in an extremely long line for just a brief moment of happiness or dread, or a very short ride for lasting emotions. That concert you’ve waited a year to attend might be disappointing and flat, and that dentist appointment you have next week might be pleasant and uneventful. We don’t always get to choose how we’ll feel about anything we’re waiting for in the same sense that we can’t always control the length of time we wait for.

My current writing schedule means I’m waiting to be able to start writing my next series every other month. Yet, I help to pass the time by structuring and outlining the next series during my ‘month off’ (really, I’m still working on the upcoming series and coming up with more thoughts and ideas, so I don’t really consider it a month off). I have other things I’m doing in the meantime to fill the void of time or broaden my creative outlets, and there are always other things I’m waiting on as well. Sometimes I forget about the things I’m waiting for, which makes it a surprise when they’re suddenly at hand!

As of now, I’m waiting on a lot of things. I’m taking a trip to see relatives I haven’t seen in over a decade, I’m moving into a new home, I’m writing my last five series, I’m starting Interactive Fiction, and I’ve got other projects in the works I won’t say just yet. Add those to the normal day-to-day waiting and there’s a lot that I’m both looking forward to and dreading. No matter how many things I’m waiting on, I always manage to find a way to make the time go by quickly.

Conclusion:

Waiting is just a natural part of life. With the concept of measurable time, we’re now able to focus on how much time there is between us and what we’re waiting for. No matter how big or small the event or thing you’re waiting for is, we’re all bound to the reality that we cannot make time go by any faster.

Is there something you’re currently waiting for? Do you ever have too many things you’re waiting on? Let us know in the comments below! We’ll be waiting for your reply!

Happy reading, writing, working, and living!

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