WWW #15: Seasons

Today’s Topic: Does the changing of seasons really change your mood?

Whether you love winter, summer, spring, or autumn, many people say that the changing of the seasons often brings about a drastic change in their mood or personality. Are these changes the result of the weather? Or is it because there are more holidays, events, memories, or celebrations during one season compared with others? Every person has their own unique experiences, and every person has a right to feel however they want to feel during any season.

That being said, the fact that some people swear they’re happier in one season than they are in another is intriguing all the same.

For me, I don’t particularly feel any mood swings or changes with the passing of the seasons. I’m not particularly more excited during summer, nor do I get melancholy in winter. I love the cold weather, so I’m generally open to doing more outside activities in the winter, but it doesn’t make me loath the heat of summer.

Yet, I have friends who say that they’re happiest in summer and spring, but feel horribly sad or upset more often in winter and autumn. Other friends swear that they’re absolutely miserably in the hot seasons and are overjoyed when autumn starts creeping in. Recently I’ve noticed that a hefty amount of these experiences have strong correlations between a friend’s favorite season and their favorite holidays.

For my friends that have small families, live away from home, or just don’t have a good relationship with their parents or siblings, winter isn’t joyful or celebratory because Christmas is a small – sometimes nonexistent – affair. For those with lots to celebrate during the three holidays that take place during autumn and winter, those six months of the year are by far the best times to be alive.

Single friends usually spurn or ignore Valentine’s Day, those that like to drink go all out for St. Patrick’s Day, and those that have religious upbringing or have family members that celebrate it look forward to reunions around Easter. Christmas is a hit or miss, Halloween gets less exciting the older you get, and Thanksgiving is usually an excuse to eat as much as humanly possible while blaming your actions on the holiday.

Every holiday has positive and negative feelings attached to it for every person, and it might not be so crazy to think that these associations are what give people the idea that their moods change with the passing seasons. Those that look forward most to autumn can feel like summer always drags, much like how seasonal travelers feel they’re braving the one season to make it to another due to an upcoming or yearly trip.

Conclusion:

Honestly, I’m starting to think that seasons have very little to do with the changing of a person’s mood or feelings. Really, a person can hate or love all or any of the seasons without the weather playing any part in their decision. Just like how people can love another person for all the wonderful qualities they posses, a person can love a season simply because of what happens during that time of the year.

What’s your favorite season? Why do you love it? Do your emotions and general mood change with the seasons? Let us know in the comments below! Let’s get a discussion going, yeah?

Happy reading, writing, working, and living!

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